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Dr. Robert James Theobald III

Performs latest treatment methods for hemorrhoids. Read More >>

Psoriasis Treatments Reviewed

Friday, July 21, 2017 09:37

 What Treatment Works? What does Not?

 

Consumer Health Reports has reviewed over 100 of the top selling treatments for Psoriasis conditions and based the products on these important criterias: Effectiveness, Value, Quality, Safety, Reorder Rates, Customer Service

Consumer Health Reports has conducted research on many of the different Psoriasis treatments online and over-the-counter. Below is an overview based on the results of this research. Of the 100 Psoriasis treatments, we found only 3 products that are effective and would recommend. We have taken the confusion out of the shopping experience by narrowing your search to the elite products in the industry. Here is our researched list of products:

 

Top 3 Psoriasis Treatments

 
Betamethasone  

Psoriasis is a relatively common skin condition. Normal skin gradually flakes off as new skin comes to the surface. In psoriasis, however, the new skin comes to the surface more quickly than normal, causing thick patches called plaques to develop. Psoriasis may be limited to a small area, often the knees, elbows or lower back. However, larger patches can develop and even grow together. Mild psoriasis is generally not uncomfortable, while more severe cases may be painful and tender.

Psoriasis should always be diagnosed by your doctor, as it can mimic certain other skin disorders. In addition, untreated psoriasis can be uncomfortable and embarrassing, though the condition is easy to treat.

Your doctor may prescribe a topical corticosteroid product. These products work by reducing inflammation and irritation, and inhibiting the growth of new skin cells. Betamethasone is a popular type of corticosteroid for psoriasis.

Betamethasone should only be applied to the skin. Take care to avoid the eyes, mouth, underarms and groin. Although unlikely, it is possible that the medication could be absorbed through the skin, causing a possible reaction if you require oral corticosteroid medications. Before beginning an oral corticosteroid, let your doctor know if you have used Betamethasone or any other corticosteroid in the past year.

Betamethasone can occasionally cause side effects including growth difficulties in children. Tell your doctor if you experience any unusual side effects or if your child shows any abnormalities in height or weight.

Betamethasone is safe and effective for many people, but is not right for everyone. Your doctor will review your medical history and list of current medications to decide whether this medication is right for you.

 
Methotrexate  

Psoriasis is an annoying and sometimes painful chronic skin disorder. It is caused by new skin cells pushing too quickly to the surface and emerging before the old cells have the chance to slough off. It may occur in small patches or large areas and may cause symptoms ranging from redness to painful buildups known plaques.

If you have the symptoms of psoriasis, it is important to see your doctor right away. Although some cases of psoriasis heal without medical intervention, untreated psoriasis can worsen over time. Additionally, the symptoms of psoriasis can sometimes mimic those of more serious skin conditions.

If your psoriasis is severe or does not respond to topical treatments, your doctor might prescribe Methotrexate. This medication can be given as a once a week injection, a once a week pill or a pill that is taken three times per day.

Methotrexate is a powerful medication but is not right for everyone. Side effects include, but are not limited to, nausea and vomiting, blood in the stool, headaches and sun sensitivity. It can also lead to liver disease.

Your doctor will review your full medical history and current list of medications before prescribing Methotrexate. He or she may want to perform blood tests and liver function tests before beginning treatment and at regular intervals while you are on the medication.

Check with your doctor or pharmacist before adding new prescription or over the counter remedies while taking Methotrexate. This includes herbals and homeopathic medications. Do not drink alcohol while taking Methotrexate.

Methotrexate is a powerful remedy but is not right for everyone. Only your doctor can help you decide whether it is right for you.

 
Tazorac  

Psoriasis is an annoying and sometimes painful chronic skin condition. It occurs when new skin cells push to the surface too quickly, resulting in redness, irritation and sometimes painful accumulations known as plaques.

Although psoriasis sometimes goes into remission on its own, it is important to see the doctor as soon as possible. Untreated psoriasis can worsen into painful plaques. Additionally, psoriasis can sometimes mimic more serious skin conditions.

If your psoriasis is moderate or severe, your doctor might prescribe Tazorac (www.tazorac.com/). This medication belongs to a class known as topical retinoids. These medications work by regulating the growth and shedding of skin cells.

Tazorac is effective and well-tolerated by many people, but is not right for everyone. It can cause localized skin irritation. Many doctors prescribe Tazorac in conjunction with a corticosteroid cream, which can greatly reduce irritation. If Tazorac is prescribed alone, ask your doctor about using moisturizers to minimize irritation.

Tazorac can greatly increase sensitivity to the sun. Minimize your sun exposure and use sunscreen at all times. This effect can be cumulative if you are also using other medications that can cause sun sensitivity. If you get a sunburn, discontinue using Tazorac and consult your doctor.

Before prescribing Tazorac, your doctor will review your full medical history and current list of medications. Check with your doctor or pharmacist before adding any new prescription or over the counter drugs while on Tazorac.

Tazorac should not be used by women who are pregnant. Many doctors recommend a negative pregnancy test two weeks prior to beginning treatment, and adequate birth control during treatment.

Tazorac is helpful to many people with psoriasis, but is not right for everyone. Only your doctor can help you decide whether this medication is right for you.

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